“Three Billboards” and “Lady Bird” Soar at the Golden Globes

 

Continue reading

Advertisements

Golden Globe Predictions:

It’s not easy to predict the Golden Globes, but somebody’s gotta do it. Notoriously, the Hollywood Foreign Press Association nominates and votes for what they like in a way that differs from groups like the Screen Actors Guild or the Academy Awards. Sometimes they make bold, daring choices; in 2014 they nominated Ava DuVernay for Best Director after she was ignored by the Academy and Directors Guild. They also ignored the Oscar campaign for both Rooney Mara and Alicia Vikander to ridiculously be placed in Supporting Actress for Carol and The Danish Girl, nominating them both in Best Actress instead. But sometimes they nominate films like The Tourist and stars Angelina Jolie and Johnny Depp in the Comedy Actor/Actress categories. 

So yeah, it’s not easy to figure out which way the Globes will swing this year. Especially in a year with no sure Best Picture frontrunner. And the fact that both Get Out and Lady Bird are separated from Three Billboards and The Shape of Water doesn’t help clear anything up. But that’s what makes this fun, because anything is possible.  

Continue reading

The Best Movies of 2017

Without movies, I’m not sure I would have survived 2017. With each new terrible tweet sent from our president’s (shudders) account, a daily barrage of demoralizing and horrifying news updates about/caused by said president and a flurry of personal setbacks this year was rough. To hold onto my sanity, I sought refuge at my local movie theater and spent more money seeing movies this year than any year in recent memory. During my extensive viewings, I laughed, I cried, I laughed until I cried, I had my heart broken and I was transported; some of my brightest memories from this year took place in front of the big screen. 

So, without further adieu, my favorite movies of 2017.
Continue reading

Making Sense of the SAG Nominations: “Get Out,” “Lady Bird,” and “Three Billboards” Soar

This morning the Screen Actors Guild named their annual nominees for excellence in acting. Much like with the Golden Globes, we saw a lot of the usual suspects, such as Sally Hawkins from The Shape of Water, Timothée Chalamet from Call Me By Your Name and Mary J. Blige from Mudbound pop up, with a few surprises like Steve Carrell from Battle of the Sexes in the Supporting Actor category and a complete shut out of Steven Spielberg’s late release heavy hitter The Post; not even Meryl Streep managed a nomination in Best Actress.

Three films emerged this morning as the strongest: Lady BirdGet Out and Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri. All three nabbed a nomination in Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble Cast in a Motion Picture (SAG’s equivalent to Best Picture) with individual nominations for its principal actors. As the largest voting block in the Academy, SAG definitely just shifted the race. 

Continue reading

Los Angeles Film Critics Name “Call Me By Your Name” Best Picture of the Year

Just days after the NYFCC came out in support for Lady Bird, the Los Angeles Film Critics came out hard for Call Me By Your Name, giving it Best Picture, Actor and Director. 

The Shape of Water also showed strength, winning Director alongside Call Me By Your Name, Actress and Cinematography. This was crucial for the film’s Oscar hopes after blanking with groups like the Gotham awards and Indie Spirits. 

Lady Bird‘s Laurie Metcalf managed a win in Supporting Actress, with Greta Gerwig winning the coveted New Generation prize. Willam Dafoe continued his dominance in Supporting Actor. 

See the full list of winners below.

Continue reading

“Lady Bird,” Named Best Picture By the New York Film Critics Circle

The New York Film Critics Circle (un)officially kicked off awards season today with the announcement of their crop of winners. The group split the Picture and Directing categories, going with Lady Bird for the former and The Florida Project‘s Sean Baker for the latter. Saoirse Ronan and Timothée Chalamet continued their success at the Gotham awards earlier this week by picking up prizes for Actor and Actress here, while Willem Dafoe staked his case to potentially steamroll Best Supporting Actor J.K. Simmons’ style. 

Perhaps the biggest surprise was Tiffany Haddish being named Best Supporting Actress for her incredible work in Girls Trip. Not even Bridesmaids‘ Melissa McCarthy, who went on to be Oscar nominated, could boast this feat (although she did get a win from the Boston Society of Film Critics). Haddish is a star on the rise and campaigning should come easy to her. This is a nice head start in a category that’s pretty fluid outside of Laurie Metcalf and Allison Janney, but Universal is going to have to step it up if she’s going to have a real shot. As of right now, they don’t even have any FYC’s for the film on their official website.

See the full list of winners below.

Continue reading

“Reputation” Review:” Who’s Taylor Swift Anyway?

If there’s one thing Taylor Swift wants you to know, it’s that the Old Taylor is dead. You definitely knew her; the Taylor who sat in the bleachers with her t-shirt longing from a distance, who stood on the VMA stage, mouth agape, as Kanye West grabbed the mic from her and declared Beyoncé “Single Ladies” to be superior. The one who danced awkwardly at every award show as if she forgot the whole world was watching. New Taylor doesn’t give press interviews ahead of album releases. In fact, she’s almost fully retreated from the spotlight and has embraced being the villain because, yes she knows what you say about her on the internet. 

Continue reading

Saoirse Ronan Soars in Greta Gerwig’s “Lady Bird”

“I just want you to be the best version of yourself.”

“What if this is the best version?”

Greta Gerwig’s directorial debut, Lady Bird, is about a lot of things. It’s a coming of age story about a high school senior coming into her own, although she hasn’t quite figured out who she’d like to be yet. It’s an earnest and honest portrait of growing up with aspirations and dreams yearning to break through the restrictive boundaries of your small, familiar town. But first and foremost, it’s about a mother and a daughter, their complicated love for one another and how similar they are despite their insistence that they couldn’t be more different. Gerwig has taken one of film’s oldest tropes and made it feel brand new.

Continue reading

“I, Tonya” Review: “But Do You Really Know?”

It’s actually kind of unbelievable that it’s taken this long for the story of Tonya Harding to make it to the big screen. As one of the characters in I, Tonya says at one point, the story has all the makings of a movie; it was the story that (pre-O.J. Simpson) captured everyone’s attention, and gave us one of history’s most infamous underdogs turned anti-heroes. 

Working from a script written Steven Rogers (Hope FloatsStepmom), director Craig Gillespie (Lars and the Real Girl) attempts to let Tonya’s hear side of the story, and if she has anything to say about it, she wants you to know that none of it was her fault. Much like the woman at the center of it all, I, Tonya is anything but conventional. It’s rigid, unapologetically sloppy but undeniably fascinating and entertaining; I dare you to try and look away. The humor is biting and dark in a way that may make you second guess your laughter. But don’t worry, Gillespie knows everyone is in on the joke and makes sure that you are too.  

Continue reading